January 18, 2018

Latest:

International: SLA’s park design for Bjarke Ingels power plant revealed -

Friday, January 12, 2018

There is still time to submit for IFLA 2018 World Congress- 4 days to deadline -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Urban-Think Tank develops low-cost housing for South African slum. -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Revisiting Landscape Architecture trends of 2017 and looking to 2018 and beyond -

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

This R15.2 Million lakeside home with a sloping green roof was just voted the best house in Britain -

Friday, December 8, 2017

UCT MLA exhibit and Jo Gibbons lecture -

Friday, December 8, 2017

Sneak peek at the Chelsea Flower Show 2018 -

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Despatch: multi-billion rand housing development due to begin Today! -

Friday, December 1, 2017

Despatch: multi-billion rand housing development set to begin today! -

Friday, December 1, 2017

Employment Position: Associate or Full Professor (tenure-stream) in Urban Forest Management, University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. -

Friday, December 1, 2017

Johannesburg City Parks and Zoo honoured at the National Business Awards -

Friday, December 1, 2017

Cape Town accepts carbon neutral development challenge -

Friday, December 1, 2017

NEW Rainbird XFS-CV Dripline -

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Our suppliers at Itacotto have some great Black Friday Deals -

Friday, November 24, 2017

Black Friday Deals on the Husqvarna Automower® -

Friday, November 24, 2017

A thank you to Bernadette Vollmer for her dedication to the role of SACLAP Registrar -

Friday, November 24, 2017

Launch of the Corobrik-SAIA Awards of Merit Announced -

Friday, November 24, 2017

New Build in Higgovale for SAOTA -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Horticulturists and herbalists join hands -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Competition for architects and urban designers as city embarks on carbon neutral development journey -

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Landowners called to report invasive plants

Landowners who have listed invasive species must notify any relevant competent authority, in writing, of the listed invasive species occurring on that land.

Furthermore, landowners must take steps to control and eradicate the listed invasive species and prevent them from spreading, the Department of Environmental Affairs said in a statement on Friday.

“Failure to do so can result in a fine and/or the work being done by the authorities, at the expense and risk of the land-owner. This includes any necessary follow-up clearing of the invasive plants, and any fire-related need to deal with the cleared biomass,” the department said.

For properties over one hectare, a Control Plan for listed invasive species must be developed. Applications must be done for a permit to keep Category 2 invasive plants and adhere to permitting conditions for Category 2 plants.

Finally, control methods must be appropriate for the listed species and the environment.

“With the fire season still upon us, invasive plants continue to pose a threat to the environment and infrastructure.

“Invasive plants can burn with 10 times the heat of indigenous plants, destroying the fynbos seeds stored in the soil, or adapted for release in low-heat fires. The invasive plants’ own seeds survive, however, and as a result they usually sprout thicker than before on land that has recently burnt,” the department said.

The department said an increase in invasive plants is a cause for concern as they increase fuel loads and aggravate the intensity and heat of fires, making it more difficult and unsafe to control.

This type of vegetation also makes fires extremely hot, which damages the burnt area’s soil structure and that has a negative impact on the productivity of such soil.

“The effect of invasive vegetation on fire increases the intensity of the flames, having an impact on indigenous vegetation, and increasing the likelihood of extreme or catastrophic loss to infrastructure and/or lives. Invasive plants out compete most endemic and indigenous plants, which require fire to germinate, thus multiple fires over a short period leads to loss of species and biodiversity,” the department said.

Priority areas to consider first when clearing are those around buildings if there is a risk of fire.

Other areas include low-density infestations, to keep the spread of invasive plants into the surrounding areas in check, the sites where initial control work has been completed and regrowth is present, to prevent densification and further infestation.

Disturbed sites, to prevent new infestations from mass germination of alien seeds in the soil. Seedlings should be controlled while they are less than 0.5 meters tall to avoid costly control work later.

For more information and a list of invasive species please visit: www.environment.co.za, www.environment.gov.za or www.invasives.org.za

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