July 15, 2018

Latest:

The 28th International Garden Festival Theme of the 2019 competition Gardens of paradise -

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Cellfast’s Oscillating Sprinklers -

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

A different perspective on the role of the Landscape Architect – a view from Delhi India -

Friday, July 6, 2018

Wacker Neuson welcomes Powerdek to its dealer network! -

Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Corobrik presents its product qualities of Geolok and Terraforce Concrete Retaining Blocks -

Friday, June 22, 2018

ILASA Water Sensitive Design Seminar -

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Easigrass lives up to its name! -

Friday, June 15, 2018

10 Year Partnership of Growth for Haifa and Prime Trees -

Monday, June 11, 2018

Faces of the Future: The next Generation -

Monday, June 11, 2018

Global Architecture & Design Awards 2018 -

Friday, June 8, 2018

An engagement across Landscape, Architecture and Urban Design hosted by PIA – UDISA – ILASA -

Thursday, June 7, 2018

On landscape architecture as the lifeblood of a city -

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Corobrik sponsors masterclass demonstrating a vision of an accessible, safe and thriving city! -

Friday, May 25, 2018

SA wins gold at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018 -

Friday, May 25, 2018

Husqvarna Broadens Premium Garden Product Offering And Expands into the High-Pressure Washer Category -

Thursday, May 24, 2018

A new approach to social resilience through landscape architecture -

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Four Seasons Property Services is transforming Brightwater Commons -

Friday, May 18, 2018

South Africa: Deputy Minister Barbara Thomson – Environmental Affairs Dept Budget Vote 2018/19 -

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Sustainability is key for Corobrik -

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

FutureScape Africa Trade Show- 1st November 2018 save the date -

Friday, May 11, 2018

The Importance of Gardens in Ecosystems

ALL green areas – whether planted landscapes, wild areas, or a road verge with weeds – contribute to the urban ecosystem. They are vital to our well-being: green areas produce air for us to breathe, they filter pollution, absorb storm water and reduce flooding, purify water and maintain a pleasant temperature. Without sufficient planted areas and infiltration – due to the many tarred and paved areas, and reflective surfaces – the city heats up. This is known as the urban heat island effect: pollution levels rise and our quality of life decreases. On summer days, especially when there is no wind, the raised temperature is already evident in the City Bowl, which is a few degrees hotter than the suburbs.
Gardens form an important part of the urban ecosystem and are not a luxury: they are a necessity. Green areas provide habitat for wildlife and are good for our well-being. Please do not feel guilty about gardening! We encourage anyone with access to alternative water sources, such as borehole or grey water, to use it responsibly to help maintain the urban ecosystem. Furthermore help spread awareness of its value and the importance of permeable surfaces for infiltration of rain. This will make a positive difference.
Some simple ways you can help preserve the urban ecosystem:
1. Do not remove successful plants. Consider valuing plants for their resilience and ecological function, in addition to personal preference. A thriving common or weedy plant is better than nothing green at all!
2. Mulch all planted areas with a 5 to 10cm thick layer of mulch. This dramatically reduces water loss from the soil surface and keeps it cool. Organic mulches such as chipped wood and leaves are best, as they feed the soil and your plants.
3. Keep areas planted, not paved. Consider how important it is for rainwater to infiltrate the soil: this is important for recharging groundwater (and good for trees) and keeps the ambient temperature down. Avoid hard surfaces where possible and use permeable paving when a hard durable surface is required.
4. If you do have a borehole, water deeply and infrequently. Mimic a good rainfall event of say 50mm and really saturate an area, with water penetrating at least 50-60cm into the soil. You may only need to do this every 3 to 4 weeks.
For more information on resilient landscaping and an educational quizz ‘How water-wise are you?’

 

This was written and contributed by: Marijke Honig

for more click here

 

 

Leave A Comment