March 17, 2018


Are you a Day Zero Hero? -

Friday, March 16, 2018

A look at Sol Kerzner’s new ultra-luxury estate in Cape Town -

Friday, March 16, 2018

Peter Veenstra to build dome of plants at Design Indaba venue in Cape Town -

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Sustainable construction is integral to superior design at 31st Corobrik Architectural Student of the Year Awards -

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Zaha Hadid Architects wins contest for water-inspired cultural hub in UAE -

Monday, March 12, 2018

100 new parks in 100 days for Durban -

Friday, March 2, 2018

Restoring Land, Growing Prosperity: Richmond Park, Cape Town New Development -

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Corobrik’s Graphite pavers add to the modern Menlyn Learning Hub -

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Marcus Evans – Reimagining the Idea of a City to Enhance Liveability -

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Landscaping for Wetlands: What is World Wetlands Day all about -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Sudpave, South Africa’s First Locally Manufactured Permeable Paving Grid! -

Friday, February 23, 2018

Playground Design: danger or risk? Do we know the difference -

Friday, February 23, 2018

A New Type of Interaction by Innovative Design -

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

IFLA Advisory Circle Article: Cultural Landscape and the Nature Culture Journey -

Monday, February 19, 2018

The South African Landscapers Institute’s (SALI) Vision for the Next Term. -

Thursday, February 15, 2018

“Biophilic” Environments & Why Amazon Filled Its New Office With 40,000 Plants -

Thursday, February 15, 2018

No Carbon Footprint! “The World’s Most Sustainable Shopping Centre”, with Rooftop Farm, to Open in Melbourne -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Our Cities Cannot be Resilient Without Intergrating Healthy Wetlands in Their Infrastructure Asset Management & Planning -

Monday, February 12, 2018

Plans for ILASA 2018 -

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Net Zero Awarded to Johannesburg’s 78 Corlett Drive -

Friday, February 2, 2018

The Importance of Gardens in Ecosystems

ALL green areas – whether planted landscapes, wild areas, or a road verge with weeds – contribute to the urban ecosystem. They are vital to our well-being: green areas produce air for us to breathe, they filter pollution, absorb storm water and reduce flooding, purify water and maintain a pleasant temperature. Without sufficient planted areas and infiltration – due to the many tarred and paved areas, and reflective surfaces – the city heats up. This is known as the urban heat island effect: pollution levels rise and our quality of life decreases. On summer days, especially when there is no wind, the raised temperature is already evident in the City Bowl, which is a few degrees hotter than the suburbs.
Gardens form an important part of the urban ecosystem and are not a luxury: they are a necessity. Green areas provide habitat for wildlife and are good for our well-being. Please do not feel guilty about gardening! We encourage anyone with access to alternative water sources, such as borehole or grey water, to use it responsibly to help maintain the urban ecosystem. Furthermore help spread awareness of its value and the importance of permeable surfaces for infiltration of rain. This will make a positive difference.
Some simple ways you can help preserve the urban ecosystem:
1. Do not remove successful plants. Consider valuing plants for their resilience and ecological function, in addition to personal preference. A thriving common or weedy plant is better than nothing green at all!
2. Mulch all planted areas with a 5 to 10cm thick layer of mulch. This dramatically reduces water loss from the soil surface and keeps it cool. Organic mulches such as chipped wood and leaves are best, as they feed the soil and your plants.
3. Keep areas planted, not paved. Consider how important it is for rainwater to infiltrate the soil: this is important for recharging groundwater (and good for trees) and keeps the ambient temperature down. Avoid hard surfaces where possible and use permeable paving when a hard durable surface is required.
4. If you do have a borehole, water deeply and infrequently. Mimic a good rainfall event of say 50mm and really saturate an area, with water penetrating at least 50-60cm into the soil. You may only need to do this every 3 to 4 weeks.
For more information on resilient landscaping and an educational quizz ‘How water-wise are you?’


This was written and contributed by: Marijke Honig

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