October 15, 2018

Latest:

Landscaping and Gardening Services Industry Analysis & Outlook 2018-2022 by Marketresearchpro -

Friday, October 12, 2018

South Africa’s Garden Day- Sunday 21 October 2018 -

Friday, October 5, 2018

Goosen takes first steps towards landscape restoration at Royal Cape -

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Just in time for summer… we introduce ‘The Blyde- Pretoria’ -

Monday, October 1, 2018

Turftech installs revolutionary multipurpose pitch at Ashton International College in Benoni -

Thursday, September 6, 2018

Brand new from Wacker Neuson, the MCT36-5 walk-behind concrete trowel, for perfect concrete finishing results -

Thursday, September 6, 2018

Organic waste not wasted for long- Corona Facility is re-shaping the waste landscape -

Thursday, September 6, 2018

Cellfast Water Timers -

Monday, September 3, 2018

Garden club hears from award-winning local -

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Beyond Compost- Reliance Reconnects Design & Soil -

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Growing a business and flourishing in farming -

Thursday, August 23, 2018

The Cape Green Forum hosts its 32nd Cape Green Trade Day 22 August 2018 -

Friday, August 17, 2018

Corobrik’s striking new paving selection -

Friday, August 17, 2018

Cape Construction Expo 12-13 September -

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

The Ethekwini Municipality Verge Competition 2018 -

Friday, August 10, 2018

Leon Kluge proves he is the best of the best at Singapore’s Garden Festival -

Friday, August 10, 2018

Johannesburg City Parks and Zoo (JCPZ) offers tender! -

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Edward Colle Appointed CEO of Belgotex -

Monday, August 6, 2018

The 28th International Garden Festival Theme of the 2019 competition Gardens of paradise -

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Cellfast’s Oscillating Sprinklers -

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

The Importance of Gardens in Ecosystems

ALL green areas – whether planted landscapes, wild areas, or a road verge with weeds – contribute to the urban ecosystem. They are vital to our well-being: green areas produce air for us to breathe, they filter pollution, absorb storm water and reduce flooding, purify water and maintain a pleasant temperature. Without sufficient planted areas and infiltration – due to the many tarred and paved areas, and reflective surfaces – the city heats up. This is known as the urban heat island effect: pollution levels rise and our quality of life decreases. On summer days, especially when there is no wind, the raised temperature is already evident in the City Bowl, which is a few degrees hotter than the suburbs.
Gardens form an important part of the urban ecosystem and are not a luxury: they are a necessity. Green areas provide habitat for wildlife and are good for our well-being. Please do not feel guilty about gardening! We encourage anyone with access to alternative water sources, such as borehole or grey water, to use it responsibly to help maintain the urban ecosystem. Furthermore help spread awareness of its value and the importance of permeable surfaces for infiltration of rain. This will make a positive difference.
Some simple ways you can help preserve the urban ecosystem:
1. Do not remove successful plants. Consider valuing plants for their resilience and ecological function, in addition to personal preference. A thriving common or weedy plant is better than nothing green at all!
2. Mulch all planted areas with a 5 to 10cm thick layer of mulch. This dramatically reduces water loss from the soil surface and keeps it cool. Organic mulches such as chipped wood and leaves are best, as they feed the soil and your plants.
3. Keep areas planted, not paved. Consider how important it is for rainwater to infiltrate the soil: this is important for recharging groundwater (and good for trees) and keeps the ambient temperature down. Avoid hard surfaces where possible and use permeable paving when a hard durable surface is required.
4. If you do have a borehole, water deeply and infrequently. Mimic a good rainfall event of say 50mm and really saturate an area, with water penetrating at least 50-60cm into the soil. You may only need to do this every 3 to 4 weeks.
For more information on resilient landscaping and an educational quizz ‘How water-wise are you?’

 

This was written and contributed by: Marijke Honig

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