January 18, 2018

Latest:

International: SLA’s park design for Bjarke Ingels power plant revealed -

Friday, January 12, 2018

There is still time to submit for IFLA 2018 World Congress- 4 days to deadline -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Urban-Think Tank develops low-cost housing for South African slum. -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Revisiting Landscape Architecture trends of 2017 and looking to 2018 and beyond -

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

This R15.2 Million lakeside home with a sloping green roof was just voted the best house in Britain -

Friday, December 8, 2017

UCT MLA exhibit and Jo Gibbons lecture -

Friday, December 8, 2017

Sneak peek at the Chelsea Flower Show 2018 -

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Despatch: multi-billion rand housing development due to begin Today! -

Friday, December 1, 2017

Despatch: multi-billion rand housing development set to begin today! -

Friday, December 1, 2017

Employment Position: Associate or Full Professor (tenure-stream) in Urban Forest Management, University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. -

Friday, December 1, 2017

Johannesburg City Parks and Zoo honoured at the National Business Awards -

Friday, December 1, 2017

Cape Town accepts carbon neutral development challenge -

Friday, December 1, 2017

NEW Rainbird XFS-CV Dripline -

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Our suppliers at Itacotto have some great Black Friday Deals -

Friday, November 24, 2017

Black Friday Deals on the Husqvarna Automower® -

Friday, November 24, 2017

A thank you to Bernadette Vollmer for her dedication to the role of SACLAP Registrar -

Friday, November 24, 2017

Launch of the Corobrik-SAIA Awards of Merit Announced -

Friday, November 24, 2017

New Build in Higgovale for SAOTA -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Horticulturists and herbalists join hands -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Competition for architects and urban designers as city embarks on carbon neutral development journey -

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

The Importance of Gardens in Ecosystems

ALL green areas – whether planted landscapes, wild areas, or a road verge with weeds – contribute to the urban ecosystem. They are vital to our well-being: green areas produce air for us to breathe, they filter pollution, absorb storm water and reduce flooding, purify water and maintain a pleasant temperature. Without sufficient planted areas and infiltration – due to the many tarred and paved areas, and reflective surfaces – the city heats up. This is known as the urban heat island effect: pollution levels rise and our quality of life decreases. On summer days, especially when there is no wind, the raised temperature is already evident in the City Bowl, which is a few degrees hotter than the suburbs.
Gardens form an important part of the urban ecosystem and are not a luxury: they are a necessity. Green areas provide habitat for wildlife and are good for our well-being. Please do not feel guilty about gardening! We encourage anyone with access to alternative water sources, such as borehole or grey water, to use it responsibly to help maintain the urban ecosystem. Furthermore help spread awareness of its value and the importance of permeable surfaces for infiltration of rain. This will make a positive difference.
Some simple ways you can help preserve the urban ecosystem:
1. Do not remove successful plants. Consider valuing plants for their resilience and ecological function, in addition to personal preference. A thriving common or weedy plant is better than nothing green at all!
2. Mulch all planted areas with a 5 to 10cm thick layer of mulch. This dramatically reduces water loss from the soil surface and keeps it cool. Organic mulches such as chipped wood and leaves are best, as they feed the soil and your plants.
3. Keep areas planted, not paved. Consider how important it is for rainwater to infiltrate the soil: this is important for recharging groundwater (and good for trees) and keeps the ambient temperature down. Avoid hard surfaces where possible and use permeable paving when a hard durable surface is required.
4. If you do have a borehole, water deeply and infrequently. Mimic a good rainfall event of say 50mm and really saturate an area, with water penetrating at least 50-60cm into the soil. You may only need to do this every 3 to 4 weeks.
For more information on resilient landscaping and an educational quizz ‘How water-wise are you?’

 

This was written and contributed by: Marijke Honig

for more click here

 

 

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