November 19, 2017

Latest:

New Build in Higgovale for SAOTA -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Horticulturists and herbalists join hands -

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Competition for architects and urban designers as city embarks on carbon neutral development journey -

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Cape Town is the first city in Africa to be named a UNESCO City of Design -

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Greenspace Takes Over London with WATG’s ‘Green Block’ Proposal -

Friday, November 10, 2017

It’s time we accelerate closer collaboration between private sector and beneficiaries to enable successful land reform -

Friday, November 10, 2017

An indoor garden concept -

Friday, November 10, 2017

Corobrik’s clay pavers create inspired walkways in Kliptown Public Environment Upgrade -

Friday, November 10, 2017

Inauguration of 2017- 2021 SACLAP Council -

Friday, October 27, 2017

Why composting is the greenest thing you can do -

Thursday, October 26, 2017

The Department of Environmental affairs: Working for Eco Systems -

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

The Importance of Gardens in Ecosystems -

Friday, October 20, 2017

Afrilandscapes rises to the occasion with top notch greening plan for grain silo district at the V&A Waterfront -

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Lucrative vacation vocation available with HUsqvarna -

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Why Skyscrapers Now Look Like Trees in Cities Around the World -

Friday, October 13, 2017

Case Study: A Green Lung in Qatar’s Desert Landscape – Oxygen Park by AECOM -

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Call For Project Proposals: Environmental Protection & Infrastructure Programmes (EPIP) -

Monday, October 9, 2017

Successful bidder announced for Clifton Precinct development, Cape Town -

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

R7.5 million Smart Park in Seawinds -

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

CityTree: Compact Green Wall Cleanses City -

Thursday, September 28, 2017

The Importance of Gardens in Ecosystems

ALL green areas – whether planted landscapes, wild areas, or a road verge with weeds – contribute to the urban ecosystem. They are vital to our well-being: green areas produce air for us to breathe, they filter pollution, absorb storm water and reduce flooding, purify water and maintain a pleasant temperature. Without sufficient planted areas and infiltration – due to the many tarred and paved areas, and reflective surfaces – the city heats up. This is known as the urban heat island effect: pollution levels rise and our quality of life decreases. On summer days, especially when there is no wind, the raised temperature is already evident in the City Bowl, which is a few degrees hotter than the suburbs.
Gardens form an important part of the urban ecosystem and are not a luxury: they are a necessity. Green areas provide habitat for wildlife and are good for our well-being. Please do not feel guilty about gardening! We encourage anyone with access to alternative water sources, such as borehole or grey water, to use it responsibly to help maintain the urban ecosystem. Furthermore help spread awareness of its value and the importance of permeable surfaces for infiltration of rain. This will make a positive difference.
Some simple ways you can help preserve the urban ecosystem:
1. Do not remove successful plants. Consider valuing plants for their resilience and ecological function, in addition to personal preference. A thriving common or weedy plant is better than nothing green at all!
2. Mulch all planted areas with a 5 to 10cm thick layer of mulch. This dramatically reduces water loss from the soil surface and keeps it cool. Organic mulches such as chipped wood and leaves are best, as they feed the soil and your plants.
3. Keep areas planted, not paved. Consider how important it is for rainwater to infiltrate the soil: this is important for recharging groundwater (and good for trees) and keeps the ambient temperature down. Avoid hard surfaces where possible and use permeable paving when a hard durable surface is required.
4. If you do have a borehole, water deeply and infrequently. Mimic a good rainfall event of say 50mm and really saturate an area, with water penetrating at least 50-60cm into the soil. You may only need to do this every 3 to 4 weeks.
For more information on resilient landscaping and an educational quizz ‘How water-wise are you?’

 

This was written and contributed by: Marijke Honig

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