February 22, 2018

Latest:

The South African Landscapers Institute’s (SALI) Vision for the Next Term. -

Thursday, February 15, 2018

“Biophilic” Environments & Why Amazon Filled Its New Office With 40,000 Plants -

Thursday, February 15, 2018

No Carbon Footprint! “The World’s Most Sustainable Shopping Centre”, with Rooftop Farm, to Open in Melbourne -

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Our Cities Cannot be Resilient Without Intergrating Healthy Wetlands in Their Infrastructure Asset Management & Planning -

Monday, February 12, 2018

Plans for ILASA 2018 -

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Net Zero Awarded to Johannesburg’s 78 Corlett Drive -

Friday, February 2, 2018

WeTheCity -

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Greenroof Project Watch: Casa Vallarta -

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Design indaba Conference 2018 21st -23th February -

Friday, January 26, 2018

2018 IPPS Southern Africa 21st Annual Conference 6 March 2018 – 9 March 2018 -

Friday, January 26, 2018

The drones that plant trees and deliver profits -

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

SANA Bursaries and Training: A Career in Horticulture -

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Project watch: Bosco Verticale (Vertical Forest), Milan -

Friday, January 19, 2018

Award winning young architects pave the way to the future   -

Friday, January 19, 2018

Reliance and City of Cape Town celebrate a major milestone in the war against waste in the Western Cape -

Thursday, January 18, 2018

International: SLA’s park design for Bjarke Ingels power plant revealed -

Friday, January 12, 2018

There is still time to submit for IFLA 2018 World Congress- 4 days to deadline -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Urban-Think Tank develops low-cost housing for South African slum. -

Friday, January 12, 2018

Revisiting Landscape Architecture trends of 2017 and looking to 2018 and beyond -

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

This R15.2 Million lakeside home with a sloping green roof was just voted the best house in Britain -

Friday, December 8, 2017

Competition for architects and urban designers as city embarks on carbon neutral development journey

The City of Cape Town is participating in the C40 Reinventing Cities Programme, a worldwide competition calling on the private sector and communities to devise carbon neutral development solutions and designs for underutilised publicly owned sites in C40 member cities. With the Reinventing Cities competition kicking off today, we are embarking on a process to make available five City owned-sites to innovative designers and implementers for carbon neutral development proposals.
The purpose of the C40 Reinventing Cities Programme is to transform underutilised urban sites into beacons of zero carbon emissions and resilient development.
Cape Town is a signatory to C40, a global network of large cities taking action to address climate change by developing and implementing policies and programmes that generate reductions in both greenhouse gas emissions and climate risks.

‘More than half of the world’s population lives in urban areas, with current projections indicating that this will increase to 70% by 2050. Cape Town is no exception. Our population has increased by 56% between 1996 and 2016. This trend is set to continue as we are facing the impacts of climate change – the current drought being a key example. Sustainable development and partnerships with the private sector and communities are no longer a choice, but a prerequisite, if we want to secure a future for our residents in times of limited resources,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Transport and Urban Development, Councillor Brett Herron.

The competition is open to the private sector who is encouraged to form multidisciplinary groups consisting of architects, urban planners and designers, developers, environmentalists, and representatives from the local community.

As part of a two-stage process, the teams must submit their expression of interest bid proposals for the development of the underutilised City-owned sites by 30 March 2018. Up to three teams will be shortlisted to participate in a second detailed proposal phase for each site, with the winning project for each site to be selected by December 2018.
Importantly, the process remains subject to all local laws and regulations pertaining to the fixed property – thus, all statutory processes will apply.
The following candidate sites form part of this competition:

Ottery site – a 48 ha plot situated along Ottery and Old Strandfontein Roads in Ottery
Mouquet Farm – a 2,4 ha open plot situated on the intersection of Old Kendal and Main Roads in Plumstead
Bishop Lavis site – a 1,4 ha plot situated along Lenton Drive in the Bishop Lavis town centre
A section of the Grand Parade in the CBD – this section is located on the north-western edge of the Parade and is currently occupied by dilapidated trading stalls and related infrastructure

Civic Centre parking site – an open surface car park of approximately 1 ha, located adjacent to the Civic Centre in the Cape Town CBD
The urban development proposals to be submitted must address the following, among others:
Reduced energy demand
Energy and resource efficiency
Use of renewable energy, use of low-carbon energy
Resilience and adaptation
Green mobility
Inclusionary approach and community benefit
Innovative architecture and urban design

‘Thus, the design proposals for each site should minimise the amount of energy a building uses for heating, cooling, hot water, lighting, ventilation, electrical services, and so forth. Choosing construction materials that minimise greenhouse gas emissions during manufacturing, transport and construction processes, but also through the lifetime of the building, are also important criteria,’ said Councillor Herron.
Managing waste is crucial, be it during or after construction. Discarded sources must be transformed into raw materials as far as possible. The design should ensure effective waste collection and separation, while construction waste must be limited.

‘Importantly, the design proposals must facilitate and encourage walking, cycling, the use of public transport and lift clubs, and at the same time discourage private vehicle use with only one occupant. We are all aware of the challenges we are facing in Cape Town with peak hour congestion and the consequences associated with it. By prioritising dense, transit-oriented growth and development along integration zones, we seek to create more inclusive communities with access to improved services, job opportunities, and affordable housing and public transport. Moreover, urban density can create the possibility for a better quality of life and a lower carbon footprint through more efficient infrastructure and planning,’ said Councillor Herron.

More information about the competition and the candidate sites from around the world is available on the C40 website. Click here for more

Leave A Comment